Sessions

DAY 1

Technology labs

Demystifying AI: what you need to know

“AI” today is used as a fantasy blanket that covers anything involving computers taking autonomous decisions. This vagueness makes it difficult to understand what exactly is going on: how intelligent are computers? Are algorithms AI? How does machine learning fit into all of this? Is The Matrix upon us?

In this session we will take a gentle, guided tour into the underbelly of AI. We will give proper names to things; explore the hidden dangers; and learn how “AI” affects our daily lives. By the end of the session, you will have a better understanding of what AI is — and is not — and have a more practical understanding of how it affects you and your work.

Tin Geber (Hivos)

Shaping narratives

What makes propaganda work today

Radical propaganda takes many forms but uses 6 fundamental augments that find favor with audiences. In this session, we unpack each of the fundamental arguments and apply them to a number of relevant cases including political campaigns. In this session, you will learn to identify the arguments used and apply these to your own contexts.

Brandon Oelofse (RNTC, the Netherlands)

Making of

On-line harassment how to react and protect yourself

We will discuss displays of hate speech and hate crime online. We will focus on the role of civil society organizations not only as human right defenders, activists and service providers but also as a possible target of hatred. What are the limits that we, as civil society leaders, are willing to accept and when we will fight back? We will briefly discuss possible counter-actions against hatred online and then in detail, we will focus on possible legal action against hate speech. What does it take to build up a successful case? Does national context matter? Does the mission of our organizations matter? Do our individual needs for protection matter?

Klára Kalibová

Shaping narratives

Fake news – how it works, how to combat it

Welcome to the new world in which «fake news» becomes a word of a year and one of the most characteristic phenomena of our decade. Why its usage rose by 365% last year and what is the real danger behind it? Is it a problem of a political world or every citizen can become a target? And most importantly, is there a way to win a battle against fake news? Join this session to get the answers to these questions, practical tips, real-life stories and fun conversation on how to tackle the challenges that are becoming a new normal in our world.

Kateryna Kruk

Common response

Common response part I

This session aims to provide time for group discussion – we aim to offer a space for participants to complain and share their stories about the specific national context and how it affects the civil space. At the same time, it will offer opportunities to trigger reactions from the other participants – what are the similar tendencies? How did they deal with them? What are the national specifics?

Elena Calistru (Funky Citizens, Romania) + TransparenCEE

Self-care of activists

Self-Care Within Community: Strategies to Survive in an Era of Burnout

This session is designed to re-ignite the self-care strategies we unknowingly carry around, and to do so in community with our allies and teammates. Utilizing individual challenges, humor, brain scans and small group exercises, Susan’s interactive facilitation style will help each participant understand why and how they can revitalize their heads and their hearts. Each person will leave with a customized “personal recess” brain-break practice based on their workload, their personality and their history. Finally, since we must support each other through our difficult, stressful and/or life-threatening activism, tools and tips will be shared on how to build connection and camaraderie within teams.

Susan Comfort (NonprofitWellness, USA)

Technology labs

Data Visualisation – how to present data in persuasive story telling

For beginners: The session is for participants who have a basic understanding of data visualization and want to convert their ideas into reality without coding or design skills. This workshop is a hands-on and participatory dive into using free and online tools (Canva and RawGraphs) to create eye-catching and professional data visualizations to convey your message online or in print. Participants will learn how to setup an account, upload data, use templates and elements, customize the design and download their finished product. At the end of the session, you will feel empowered to create your own infographics to share with the world. Please bring your laptop or mobile device to the workshop!

Advanced users: If you like turning numbers into stories and enjoy working with data visualization, this workshop is for you. During 90 minutes, the participants will be given various examples of dataviz with a challenge to improve them and explain to the group why their alterations make better versions. Do join the workshop if you do not feel like an expert (yet), you’ll learn a lot from the others and will leave the room with better practical understanding of the major dataviz principles, such as messaging, labeling, choosing right chart types, etc.

Neema Iyer (beginners)
Nino Macharashvili (advanced)

Sharping narratives

How to find a radical in the room

There are a great number of conditions that exist in a society that breed radical thinking. In this hands-on session, we map our audience’s influencers, drivers, beliefs and payoffs toward radical thinking. Using Isis as an example, we explore how they have understood their audience’s beliefs and emotional payoffs to target them in a meaningful and highly successful way. Finally this session allows you to map the drivers and influencers in your own context.

Brandon Oelofse (RNTC, the Netherlands)

Common response

Common response part II

This session aims to provide time for group discussion – we aim to offer a space for participants to complain and share their stories about the specific national context and how it affects the civil space. At the same time, it will offer opportunities to trigger reactions from the other participants – what are the similar tendencies? How did they deal with them? What are the national specifics?

Elena Calistru (Funky Citizens, Romania) + TransparenCEE

DAY 2

Varia

Humor, irony, sarcasm – how to use it in your communication

Political satire is becoming one of the most recognizable types of comedy in the last decade, being used not just like a form of art or social critique, but as a means of political education and tool against raising apathy. As such it is targeted by oppressive regimes, censored, banned and prosecuted. What is the power of humor, irony and satire and how to use it will be the topic of this workshop.

What types and formats of satire are the most popular ways to get your message across? What is the power of political memes and how are they used by government trolls and bots? In the world of fast internet access and 24 hours media cycle, what is the power of satiric news, and do we need to threat humor as a necessary method to reach a wider audience? And can we use satire to build a common identity where we can joke about our similarities and not mock our differences?

Combating prejudice, hate, and oppression with humor is a sign of a free healthy society, and it is time for Europe to realize that entertainment is one of the cornerstones our democracies are now built.

Borna Sor (News Bar, Croatia)

Shaping narratives

How to make “good propaganda”

The “Radical narrative”, “Jihadi Narrative” or “Propaganda” are closely linked to story devices to help them reach their audiences. How can story be similarly used to challenge and provide alternative narratives? In this session, we examine persuasion and how it is used in propaganda and fake news. We explore emotion as a driving force in behavior change and how to formulate counter narratives.

Brandon Oelofse (RNTC, the Netherlands)

Making of

Mobilizing p. I

Avnik Melikian (Society Without Violence, Armenia)
Klementyna Suchanow (Polish Women on Strike)
Jakub Rok (Camp for the Forest, Poland)

Our societies are built on stories – stories of success and failure. They interact with our thinking in ways that either restrict or strengthen the possibility for change and progress.

For us activists, protests and civil disobedience have become our second homes, and in those terms, mobilizing – our means of living. But how do we define success? When do we know that our efforts have been successful? What are the underlying approaches and values that we use as premises to build our movements on?

Let’s find out together during the “Mobilizing I” session. We will engage in discussions through storytelling and will identify a pattern of reference points and approaches that can assist us in successful mobilization attempts.

Technology labs

Technologies to increase online visibility

Audiences consume content in a very different way than a few years ago. 10 years ago most of the content was text, then photos, and now it’s quickly becoming videos. How to prepare it quickly without a masters degree in filmmaking using just a smartphone? During this workshop, you will get an idea about modern trends in social media communication and a useful tips & tricks on how to prepare creative content with a few mobile apps.

Katarzyna Zwolak-Szwechowicz (TechSoup Europe)

Common response

Common response p. III

This session aims to provide time for group discussion – we aim to offer a space for participants to complain and share their stories about the specific national context and how it affects the civil space. At the same time, it will offer opportunities to trigger reactions from the other participants – what are the similar tendencies? How did they deal with them? What are the national specifics?

Elena Calistru (Funky Citizens, Romania) + TransparenCEE

Sharping narratives

How we failed… Counter narratives and what not to do

There have been concerted efforts to counter large-scale radicalization campaigns through counter campaigns. There are 5 strategies for how campaigns can be used to deliver counter messaging. While the field of counter narrative evolves, key lessons have been learnt so far. In this session, we explore tactics and lessons learnt in 3 campaigns, what works well and what is not working at all.

Brandon Oelofse (RNTC, the Netherlands)

Making of

Mobilizing p. II – Don’t leave it only to the activists

Do you feel tired of fighting against enemies whose resources seem unlimited? Have you lost hope in society? Do you feel tired and alone? Then come, join us at Declic’s session: Don’t leave it only to the activists. We plan on changing your mind. We’ll show you how activism can be engage big audiences if we approach in a creative way. We don’t think activists should do it alone and we’ll talk about successful ways to involve large groups of citizens in your actions. Are you up for it?

Tudor Bradatan (Declic, Romania)
Olga Popescu (Declic, Romania)

Sharping narratives

Building better Counter Campaigns

While radical groups have been excellent at promoting their own stories, counter narratives have been caught in responding and not setting their own agenda. Alternate narratives offer us the opportunity to set the discussion. This practical session starts from the ground up in building powerful alternative narratives.

Brandon Oelofse (RNTC, the Netherlands)

Varia

Reportage, video – tips and tricks

You’ve probably heard the word “storytelling” many times. It’s a nice buzzword and kind of everybody does it these days. But storytelling is not about making super innovative VR 360 stories – it’s about knowing how to tell them so that the audience gets engaged. Only then you can add all the fancy things on top.

 

During our workshop we will:

– break down three replicable story scenarios,
– explain how you can use them,
– show how you can apply them to facebook post or a YouTube movie
– give you tools and examples so you can make engaging stories on your own

Jakub Górnicki (Outriders)